David’s Great North Run

UPDATE: David will be undertaking the Great North Run again this year for CAAT. By sponsoring him you can help us to challenge the arms trade.

This summer one of our supporters, David Watson, pounded the pavements to raise some funds for a grateful CAAT , this is his story.

David finishes his run!
David finishes his run!

This time last year, I had never run more than 5 kilometres at my local park, so it’s fair to say that when I put my name in the ballot for the Great North Run (21 km), I was aiming to stretch my levels of endurance further than ever before. Despite having dodgy knees, I had to believe I could do it.

When I secured my place, I knew I had an ideal opportunity to raise funds for CAAT, but after only a fortnight I was within £150 of my £500 target, so I doubled it to £1000.

The Great North Run is hard because so much of it is uphill, so I decided to do a couple of easier half marathons as part of my training, starting with the Southend Half Marathon in June. A sweltering hot day saw me complete my first halfer with my knees intact in just under two hours. Continue reading “David’s Great North Run”

Green markets or gun markets

David Watson from Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) writes on weapons, wars and climate change for Blog Action Day on Climate Change – 15 October 2009.

On 14 October, BBC’s Newsnight asked the question “Can you be green and capitalist?”

Simon Retallack, associate director at the centre-left think tank, the Institute for Public Policy Research, was asked how best to fight climate change. He rejected an approach based on changing people’s values, saying: “I worry that the [anti-consumerist] approach gets in the way of putting in place some consumerist approaches to solving some of these problems that doesn’t (sic) entail trying to engineer changing people’s values.”

The interviewer didn’t ask Retallack if not changing our values meant we could continue to support wars and military occupations in strategically important locations.

Neither did he offer an opinion on whether this meant that the UK and the US could carry on spending so much of their stretched budgets subsidising their arms industries. Continue reading “Green markets or gun markets”